The Noise in Space


superlinguo:

tastefullyoffensive:

Name Improvements for Everyday Stuff [x]

Reblogging because these new names for everyday stuff are bringing some LOLs to our weekend.

The creative names above are reminding us of the awesome power of the compound word - most of the new names offered here are compound words (with a notable exception being the cute portmanteau ‘porksicle’). 

Compound words are great. Why feel restricted by using words on their own? Combine them and feel the power of a new, compounded word! 

We classify a compound word as a word which is composed of more than one free morpheme

In linguistic morphology, we make the distinction between a bound morpheme as a morpheme (the smallest grammatical unit in a language) that appears only as part of a larger word, whereas free or unbound morpheme is one that can stand alone. A compound word brings together previously ‘free’ or separate words, and bam, a new word is created.

Generally, an English compound word consists of a ‘head’ (e.g. moose) and a ‘modifier’ (e.g. sand, denoting what type of moose it is). 

We can get very creative in English with compound words - they can use nouns, verbs, adjectives, prepositions and adverbs. And they can be hyphenated (e.g. mother-in-law), closed (e.g. football, childlike) or open (e.g. real estate). 

Compound words demonstrate the flexibility and malleability of language - if you can’t find a word that fits, put two (or more) others together and you’re all set. 


Via Superlinguo


mindblowingscience:

Practicing life on Mars, on a Hawaiian volcano

A team of researchers have been living in a simulated Mars habitat on a Hawaiian volcano for the past four months, practicing what it would be like to live on Mars. They’re “returning to earth" today.

The Hawaii Space Exploration Analog & Simulation, or HI-SEAS, is a long duration Mars exploration analog study run by the University of Hawaii.

Snip from a Reuters profile:

For the most part, expedition leader Casey Stedman and his five crewmates have stayed inside their 1,000-square foot (93-square meter) solar-powered dome, venturing out only for simulated spacewalks and doing so only when fully attired in mock spacesuits.

"I haven’t seen a tree, smelled the rain, heard a bird, or felt wind on my skin in four months,” Stedman wrote in a blog on Instagram. Stedman is a U.S. Air Force Reserve officer, graduate student at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Worldwide. “We are simulating a long-duration mission on Mars, with a focus on crew psychology in isolation,” the crew said during an online interview with Reddit on Sunday.

Follow them on Twitter and Facebook.

You can read that Reddit AMA here.

Ross Lockwood has been documenting the mission in photos, and you can browse his images here.


Via unaxiomatically



But here is the truth of nostalgia: we don’t feel it for who we were, but who we weren’t. We feel it for all the possibilities that were open to us, but that we didn’t take.

Time is like wax, dripping from a candle flame. In the moment, it is molten and falling, with the capability to transform into any shape. Then the moment passes, and the wax hits the table top and solidifies into the shape it will always be. It becomes the past, a solid single record of what happened, still holding in its wild curves and contours the potential of every shape it could have held.

It is impossible not to feel a little sad, looking at that bit of wax. That bit of the past. It is impossible not to think of all the wild forms that wax now will never take. The village, glimpsed from a train window, beautiful and impossible and impossibly beautiful on a mountaintop, and you wonder what it would be if you stepped off the train and walked up the trail to its quiet streets and lived there for the rest of your life. All variety of lost opportunity spied from the windows of public transportation, really. It can be overwhelming, this splattered, inert wax recording every turn not taken.

‘What’s the point?’ you ask. ‘Why bother?’ you say. But then you remember — I remember! — that we are even now in another bit of molten wax. We are in a moment that is still falling, still volatile, and we will never be anywhere else. We will always be in that most dangerous, most exciting, most possible time of all: the Now. Where we never can know what shape the next moment will take. Stay tuned next for, well…let’s just find out together, shall we?

Welcome To Night Vale episode 21, “A Memory Of Europe” (via everythingiveseentwice) Via unaxiomatically



pronetoobsess:

Just some of the details I threw together last minute for my husband’s bday dinner. It was supposed to be a small, informal affair, but I thought of a few things while he was watching Doctor Who last night. :)







crayolagron:

osheamobile:

drnewtgeiszler:

Pacific Rim Theme Song on Tesla Coils

THE WAY IT WAS MEANT TO BE PLAYED

is this actually happening right now


Via unaxiomatically


creative-munchies:

Favourite work of the week, amazing food photography with a space narrative twist!

Endless Books: 8 Weeks
- Dina Belenko

(Source: behance.net)


Via unaxiomatically

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